Analyst – Business Development

Analyst – Business Development

Are you drawn to problems in the Indian education system? Do you want to work in an entrepreneurial set-up? We’re hiring! Join the Meghnad Desai Academy of Economics (MDAE) team. We are looking for a talented young Analyst to assist in our business development efforts. This is a full-time role based in Mumbai. As a BD Analyst you will: Assist in the execution of marketing strategies to generate awareness about the Academy Take charge of the admissions lifecycle – counsel students, invite applications, as well as facilitate entrance tests, interviews and offers Manage student and faculty interactions – phone, email, social media, walk-ins etc. Enhance our branding efforts by organizing events, seminars, talks & presentations at leading colleges across the country Efficiently managing internal systems. Build and maintain databases and assist in day to day administration What we look for in you: 0-3 years’ work experience in any field, demonstrated experience in working well in different teams and in different roles. This can be in the form of internships, other activities in college, etc. Strong networking and project management skills Excellent communication skills Enjoy people interaction MDAE can offer you a competitive salary and other perquisites commensurate with your competencies. If interested contact Rajesh Gupta (Partner) – rvgpersonal@gmail.com / 8655861000 or Karan Shah (COO) – karan.shah@meghnaddesaiacademy.org /...
Associate – Business Development

Associate – Business Development

Are you drawn to problems in the Indian education system? Do you want to work in an entrepreneurial set-up? We’re hiring! Join the Meghnad Desai Academy of Economics (MDAE) team. We are looking for a talented young Associate to spearhead our business development efforts. This is a full-time role based in Mumbai. As a BD Associate you will:  Rub shoulders and brainstorm on strategy with senior management from JP Morgan, Deutsche Bank, AON Hewitt, MIT, Wellington Fund, IMF etc. Have complete executional responsibilities towards our branding and admissions efforts Establish key stakeholder relationships with leading education institutes across the country Derive and present strategic insights through data analysis Develop, source and curate content for our social media handles What we look for in you: 0-3 years’ work experience in any field, demonstrated experience in working well in different teams and in different roles. This can be in the form of internships, other activities in college, etc. Strong networking and project management skills Strong analytical skills and ability to work with data Within 3 months, you will: Present the MDAE story in front of faculty, deans and students of premier institutes across India Monitor all forms of student interactions – emails, phone, social media, seminars, campus events etc. Identify new geographies where MDAE should establish a footing Create contact points with other influencers – counsellors, coaching classes, corporates etc. Within 6 months, you will: Manage relationships with decision-makers across the entire education ecosystem Run ancillary courses – Summer schools, winter schools, weekend programs across India Assist in creating alternative revenue channels – test-prep, executive education wings, online courses Run the...

Government versus Markets – The Question of Persuasion

There is a growing voice of reason in India today that is passionately arguing that government interference in the economy is the primary cause of India’s lack of dynamism and prosperity. Those making this argument primarily draw their inspiration from the writings of classical liberals such as John Locke (a 17th century English philosopher and social theorist) and Frederic Bastiat (a 19th century Frenchman who is principally responsible for having introduced the concept of opportunity cost into economic theory) and of American libertarian economists such as Friedrich Hayek (1974 Nobel Prize winner) and Milton Friedman (1976 Nobel Prize winner). These intellectuals have argued, each in their own way, that free enterprise is the only possible means of creating widespread prosperity, and that the rule of law should be constituted in such a way that men and women can be free to truck, barter and trade as and when they see fit, without any kind of supra-individual authority (viz. the government) having a say in the matter. Those in present-day India that subscribe to this view essentially view government activity in the economy as not only unnecessary but also value-reducing. They propose, in effect, the idea that individuals know what is in their self-interest, and as long as an individual’s pursuit of self-interest does not infringe on the rights of others to pursue their self-interests, then a kind of human action emerges by which the common good is spontaneously delivered without any necessity of human design. Furthermore, this is the only way to achieve enhanced levels of well-being for all members of society as such a spontaneous order is, by...
‘Putting People at the Centre’ – by Prof. Neeraj Hatekar

‘Putting People at the Centre’ – by Prof. Neeraj Hatekar

People often are stubborn, miss out on advantageous deals, often procrastinate and sometimes act heroically. A lot of such behaviours puzzle the economist, because they appear to deviate from rational, utility maximizing behavior. But like all puzzles, they are in crying need of an explanation. Not only is this necessary to satisfy the intellectual urge, but sometimes important for policy as well. After all, if seemingly irrational decisions by individuals are standing in the way of improvements in their lives, then it is important to understand the reasons and provide the necessary nudges to push people into taking the correct decisions.   Behavioural economics is one such attempt. The area can be broadly defined as the area that seeks to understand the impact of psychological, social, emotional and cognitive factors on decision making by individuals. As you can well imagine, behavioural economics is a very active academic agenda and has given rise to a great deal of research in some of the world’s leading journals. It is obviously impossible to discuss even a fraction of the research is a small note such as this. I will only discuss an important concept in behavioural economics, i.e. loss aversion that will give the reader a flavor of how this subject helps us understand seemingly irrational decisions. Loss aversion is the idea that we value potential gains from a reference position less than potential losses from the same reference position. The function that maps potential outcomes into values is called the “value function”, a part of a construct called “Prospect Theory” that was introduced to economics in a famous paper by Daniel Kahneman...
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